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Now that I've started final planing I have a question.  I am using PHY perfectionist taper from the RodDNA archives.  If the station diameter stated is .270 is that pre or post gluing?

I am on the numbers plus 1 thousandth now when I dry fit the strips.  If the number is post gluing then how much more do I need to take off to allow for the glue?  Does the type of glue being used make any significant difference?

I know this isn't critical, as Dave Norling says, "even if your off, the worst that can happen is that you'll end up with a really nice fly rod."  But thought I would see what everyone else has to say.  (Ralph Tuttle)

    You've raised a subject about which there is considerable disagreement.  I use Shell Epon and allow .002" (.001" per strip) for tips, and .004" for butts.  When planing, my target dimensions for tips are 1/2 the  flat to flat dimension minus .001" , and minus .002" for butts.    Different glues may perform differently.  Different techniques for removing the glue may remove more or less of the precious power fibers.  If I had to guess, I'd say more people make their early rods oversized than undersized, if that tells you anything.  (Harry Boyd)

    If the station diameter stated is .270 is that pre or post gluing?

    Post-gluing.

    I am on the numbers plus 1 thousandth now when I dry fit the strips. If the number is post gluing then how much more do I need to take off to allow for the glue?  Does the type of glue being used make any significant difference?

    As you suspect, this rather depends on the glue.  Resorcinol seems to add about 0.006-0.007" to the dry diameter, but resorcinol  has  wood  flour  in  the  mix.   Epoxies may only add 0.001-0.002".  Don't know about Titebond, etc.  Also depends to some  degree  on  how  heavily  you bind  (which impacts squeeze-out), how much glue you use, how fast it sets, etc., etc.

    I know this isn't critical, as Dave Norling says, "even if your off, the worst that can happen is that you'll end up with a really nice fly rod".  But thought I would see what everyone else has to say.

    You're probably fine where you're at.  Gives you some margin when sanding/scraping post-gluing to get the excess glue and binding thread fuzz off.  A little extra sanding will get you spot-on the numbers, plus get you a good surface for the varnish, IMHO.  Once you know what you gain in diameter from your glue, you can tweak your numbers accordingly, but still not a bad idea to come out a little on the high side to allow for any "oopses" during cleanup, etc.  (Todd Enders)

    Take a couple of scraps a few inches long, plane them square, measure the thickness of each at a marked spot, and then glue and bind them together, matching the marks.  After the glue is dry and scraped off, measure the thickness of the glued part and see how it compares to the sum of the two individual pieces.  Then, send a message to the list and tell us all which glue you used and what your results were. <G>  It may have been done in the distant past, but I don't remember seeing such a message before...  (Claude Freaner)

      I hate it when people point out the obvious.  Specially when I don't see it!

      I had a set of 12" practice strips that I was going to use to bind and then brown tone half and put various wraps on to see what looked good.  For some reason it never occurred to me to use those to test my own question. Thanks.

      For what it is worth here is what I did.  I final planed them to the dimensions for the butt end and then wrapped them with tape.  I then took measurements in three places.  Unwrapped them and took four passes with a 212 scraper off the pith side apex.  Glued them with Titebond II and hand bound them.  Let them sit for a day and then took of the binding and first tried a razor blade scraper.  Didn't like that, too many chatter marks. Used my 212.  didn't like that, felt like I was taking a variable amount off.  Tried sanding and felt I had the most control.

      This resulted in one measurement, the middle one, remained at the number and the two an inch form the ends ended a couple of thousandths less than the original measurement.  Two explanations come to mind.  When I took my first measurements the tape and finger pressure does not fully compress the rod pieces together when measuring.  Second that my ineptitude at getting the glue off meant that I was taking more off at the ends with the scraper.

      Don't know if this helps anyone else but it did help me understand the process better.   And I  still have my section to do some test wraps on!   (Ralph Tuttle)

        Hold the razor blade between the thumb and first finger. As you scrape, let the blade flip back and forth between your fingers.

        No chatter and lots of control. Give it a try on some scraps. (Tony Spezio)

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