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I apologize if missed this in an earlier thread, but can someone explain "turnover point" for me?  What is that in functional terms?  How do you identify it in the taper or stress values of a taper?  (David Bolin)

    Turnover pt is simply the point of maximum tip stress. It's the point where the stress curve turns or stops ascending. It is a point on a Garrison or Deflection graph ( not a rod deflection chart). It is of no value except to evaluate an individuals perception of a rod. It is one of the things we can alter with a taper. I just thought it would be interesting to see if people could sense it while casting...some can, some can't. I'm not suggesting that my test rods are of any value at all, they were just my way of establishing some criteria by which rods could be evaluated and stress curves put in some context that people could understand. No doubt there are better ways to do this. It's my naive way to answer the question, " what are the key components of a stress curve."

    Or, "If I am looking at a stress curve can I tell if I will like the rod." There is nothing conclusive here, just another little step, I hope. The middle three rods, tip stress, are the ones that test this premise.  (Jerry Foster)

      Does this turnover point effect how the line is traveling when cast and if so, how does it affect the line being cast?  Also, it is said that a hinge like Wayne incorporated into his designs, would enable an easier roll cast, how does this happen?  (Ren Monllor)

        For me, the closer the turnover point to the tip the tighter the loops but I didn’t like the stiffness it imparted.

        For what it’s worth, my new rod is a great roll casting rod without a hinge.  (Jim Lowe)

        The further the stress from the tip: IE should throw a wider loop. No it will not effect Roll casting. Its not really a hinge as compared to Wayne's butt hinges it really a different thing here. (Gary Nicholson)

      Cool!  Why didn't I think of that?  I suppose that has something to do with being an amateur.  I learn something new every day.

      Of the 444 tapers in my research database, the average turnover point (peak stress) is 14 inches from the tip top with an average stress value of 183,000.  That's using Garrison straight stress calculations.  The average values are 26 inches and 102,000 in FlexRod bent stress values.  That doesn't add much to the analysis on average, but the difference between the peak straight and bent stress points can be significant depending on the taper design.

      I've added the Turnover point values to the FlexRod statistics view.  I'll try to post the new version for download in the next day or two.  Here's a few Payne tapers with Garrison style stress values:

      Estimated

      Inches

      Data

      Line

      Casting

      Peak

      from

      Num

      Taper

      Wt

      Distance

      Stress

      Tip

      328

      Payne Jim 100

      4

      40

      202

      10

      329

      Payne Jim 100H

      5

      50

      181

      10

      331

      Payne Jim 101

      5

      50

      185

      15

      330

      Payne Jim 101

      5

      50

      158

      10

      332

      Payne Jim 102

      5

      50

      182

      20

      333

      Payne Jim 103

      5

      50

      260

      20

      334

      Payne Jim 104

      6

      60

      196

      10

      335

      Payne Jim 198

      4

      40

      145

      15

      336

      Payne Jim 200

      5

      50

      216

      10

      337

      Payne Jim 200H

      5

      50

      194

      15

      338

      Payne Jim 200L Rod #1

      4

      40

      198

      5

      502

      Payne Jim 200L Rod #2 (Heavier tip)

      4

      40

      201

      10

      503

      Payne Jim 200L Rod #2 (Light tip)

      4

      40

      206

      5

      339

      Payne Jim 202 Slow Action 1920

      5

      50

      215

      20

      340

      Payne Jim 204

      6

      60

      224

      10

      341

      Payne Jim 206

      6

      60

      281

      5

      343

      Payne Jim 214 7'9" 5/6 wt. Rod #3

      6

      60

      200

      55

      342

      Payne Jim 214 Rod #1

      6

      60

      200

      55

      473

      Payne Jim 214 Rod #2

      6

      60

      172

      40

      344

      Payne Jim 262

      4

      40

      109

      10

      345

      Payne Jim 400

      8

      80

      285

      15

      346

      Payne Jim 79 6/7 wt.

      6

      60

      135

      25

      347

      Payne Jim 95 6' 3/4 wt

      2

      20

      108

      10

      348

      Payne Jim 96

      3

      30

      111

      20

      349

      Payne Jim 97

      4

      40

      143

      5

      350

      Payne Jim 98 rod 1

      4

      40

      127

      10

      351

      Payne Jim 98 rod 2

      4

      40

      167

      10

      504

      Payne Jim Parabolic 71 4 wt

      4

      40

      139

      10

      353

      Payne Jim Parabolic 71 for 3 or 4

      4

      40

      182

      5

      354

      Payne Jim Parabolic 76 for 4 or 5

      4

      40

      177

      50

      355

      Payne Jim Parabolic 79 for 4 or 5

      5

      50

      119

      25

      356

      Payne Jim Parabolic 79 for 6 or 7

      6

      60

      196

      50

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       

       

       

       

       

       

      I hope I have an opportunity to cast your experimental rod series some day.  I think it would be very interesting.  I'm building a similar experimental series this year.  It's the five standard 7.5’ 5 wt tapers from the research posted on the blog.  I hope to have three of them at SRG this year if I don't spend to much time fishing.  (David Bolin)

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